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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the job as president of the united states. you heard in those two phone calls what this is such a divided race. >> two key factors with general elections, one is a money the republican support that will far outspend. but democrats will say that they have a better ground campaign. >> i would rather have more money than less. the democrats had more money in 2008. they bragged about it then and it was a bigger advantage. ground teams are hard to measure until election day. in 2010, the democrats ground teams did not help them much, did they? in 2008, they had a candid but that really captured the heart of the country. both parties really understand how to microtarget people based on things we buy and our past voting and purchasing behavior. they can identify not only who you are, but what specific messages that need to be spoken to you or e-mail to you to get you to move one way or the other on the political spectrum. they know how to find us now. they know where to reach us and they know what to say to us. both parties will have a pretty strong ground game. the fact that republicans have mo
are being smaller and one way you do that as is this idea of having crews fly from the united states to overseas operating theaters to replace each other to a policy sometimes called cruise swaps or think swaps. it's hard to do and in fairness to the navy it's already been done on some ships and in fairness to the navy so i think that's the kind of idea that needs to be expanded and generalize because we need more innovative ways of using late lamented -- limited sources of what we are to have. >> going forward regardless of who is president the administration may change but the math remains the same. there are some hard fiscal issues they will have to deal with an and defense is going to have hard strategic choices and i look forward to getting past the election when we can see whatever administration is in charge and what they start to do in terms of making the strategic choices but the longer you wait the tougher the decisions get. this idea that both sides are pursuing, setting a particular budget target and saying that is what we are going to stick to and fill in the strategy be
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
the ascension into the world trade association. she said the united states must normalize trade relations so american business can reap -- speakingrussia's in the new york times, this piece in the weekly review pointing out the democratic party realized one kind of history and it would like to realize another with hillary. it is time for a woman. both conventions there were ghosts of politics past, present, and teacher. next is he larry. caller: i have been watching this for -- ever since it started here. i have been paying close attention throughout my life. my parents were democrats. i have seen them, and i have seen -- i became an independent. i voted for the ban that would best do the job. well, in the last four years i have seen republicans cost the united states a downgrade adventure it's true -- in its credit rating. i have seen them block every opportunity to come to a budget conclusion. i have seen paul ryan and make statements that he knows are false. all through the whole scenario of the last four years. you would know he is lying about fax. as far as mitt romney goes, you're sorr
barack obama president of the united states of america. >> this is america's choice. >>> we'd like to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to this, the democratic national convention in charlotte, north carolina. everyone here is waiting to hear what bill clinton will say about president obama tonight as well as his own time in the white house. but another speech tonight could make or break the democrats' hope for keeping control of the united states senate. elizabeth warren is challenging republican senator scott brown in massachusetts. coming up in this hour, we'll hear praise of bill clinton from someone you might not expect. >> coming from the republicans, vice presidential candidate paul ryan sat down with cnn's piers morgan to compare the clinton and obama presidencies. the two presidents have not always been close, obviously. our chief national correspondent john king covered the clinton white house for us. >> these two presidents, the former president and president obama are more than at peace now. you may say both men share a little bit of numbers
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
in and see him. him is the president of the united states. he's very much a junior partner. that is the new vice presidency. and that's what's really changed. it began under mondale and was that way to our country -- well, it wasn't so useful under cheney but i think now the vice president is a junior partner. he's explained to barack obama. looking up to him as a smarter guy, perhaps a tougher guy. but certainly with great loyalty. >> ed shultz, we're leading up to the president's speech. what are your impressions there? >> he was trying really hard tonight. he was trying to get as emotionally connected to the audience as he possibly could. it wasn't his smoothest performance, but it was effective. you could tell the crowd was involved. they know this man. they know what he's about. he's a genuine guy. high on sincerity, believable. i thought it was good testimony to the president. >> chris? >> i don't think we've seen that pitch of the president so far. the idea that it's about his judgment and what's in his gut and this kind of undescribable part of his being that can make the right call
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
an anti-muslim film produced in the united states. welcome to america's election headquarters. i'm gregg jarrett. >> heather: i'm header childers. u.s. na to have coalition say insurgents surged the embassy last night. how did the militants get past all that security to begin with. conner is live in kabul with the latest. >> reporter: this is one of more serious breaches we've seen in afghanistan. it's not clear how they got in the outer rim of security into the camp leatherneck area. they say at least 17 taliban fighters breached the outer perimeter of security. once they were inside they launched a massive attack on the camp. this is a camp where there are more than 10,000 u.s. marines and british troops including prince harry is also stationed there. the attack lasted for some period of time. it started after 10:00 p.m. last night. taliban hit the base with small arms, to grenades to rocket launchers. two u.s. marines were killed and several others were injured and buildings were seriously damaged in the attack. it was a brazen attack. taliban don't have night vision capability to lau
and a white america and latino america and asian america. there's a united states of america. >> eight years after the keynote that launched his national career, four years after becoming the nation's first african-american nominee, tonight president barack obama accepts the nomination a second time. tonight the president makes his case for four more years. >> four more years. >> america needs four more years. >> tonight more from the first lady, vice president biden, caroline kennedy, the foo fighters? yes, the foo fighters. weather moved tonight indoors. but after a first night owned by michelle obama, after a second night owned by president clinton, expectations for the finale are sky high. msnbc's primetime coverage of the democratic national convention's final night begins right now. >>> thank you for joining us. i'm rachel maddow here at msnbc headquarters in new york. i'm joined by ed shultz, melissa harris-perry, chris hayes, and the senior strategist steve schmidt. lawrence o'donnell and al sharpton will be joining us in a moment. leading us from the site of the convention is our co
antonio willing, to the united states congress. my family story isn't special. what is special is the america that makes our story possible. ours is a nation like no other, a place where great journeys can be made in a single generation, no matter who you are or where you come from, the past is always forward. america didn't become the land of opportunity by accident. my grandmother's generation and generations before, always saw beyond the horizons of their own lives and their own circumstances, they believe that opportunity created today would lead to prosperity tomorrow. that's the country they envisioned and that's the country they helped build. the roads and bridges they built, the schools and universities they created, the rights they fought for and won. these open the doors to a decent job, a secure retirement, a chance for your children to do better than you did, and that's the middle class, the engine of our economic growth. with hard work, everybody ought to be able to get there, and with hard work, everybody ought to be able to stay there. and go beyond. the dream of
international indebtedness. if the united states economy is not as strong as it has been in the past, we cannot protect our values around the globe, and we cannot negotiate with bankers. this gives us serious weaknesses on the economic and national-security front. the ultimate insult, we handed to the next generation that had no safe in the kinds of things we have seen go on and ask them to pick up the bill, and that seems like a gross injustice and mass. gerri: i want you to respond to something, david axelrod, the president's base of riser said about this and why the president is doing the right thing. here he is. >> the president's plan would do what the simpson bowles plan would do, cut the deficit by $4 trillion, reduce attack under our deficits down to 3 percent of the gross domestic product which is what everybody agrees we need to stabilize the debt. then we will be in a position to begin reducing it further. gerri: what do you make of that. >> perfect except for a couple of flaws. we have not seen the growth and are not likely to get the kind of growth that they assume in those budget
of the united states. someday it will be a woman. someday it'll be a hispanic or another white male. the americans have a good grasp of that. what dole said -- joel said is right on target. that is not a priority in terms of trying to message on the president's race. >> when you're talking about any ism, we have both been in situations where we have been treated sexistly. it is much more powerful when john paulson out than we do. -- calls it out than when we do. >> allow to push back that republicans are the only -- i want to push back on the thought republicans are only pushing the wedge issues. obama the same mitt romney will support you. how is that any different than what the republicans are doing? >> they brought it up. we did not. if john had said we are going to get the run on the war on women. they're going to do with the birth control and everything else. we would have said everything was settled in 1960. i do not think they will be that stupid. that is a moderate governor hugh did not have that record in massachusetts. these stands were unimaginable two years ago. we would
of countries from around the world... ...with the best math scores. ...the united states would be on that list. in 25th place. let's raise academic standards across the nation. let's get back to the head of the class. let's solve this. but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snapshot from progressive. test-drive snapshot before you switch. visit progressive.com today. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing a reason...to look twice. introducing a stunning work of technology -- the entirely new lexus es. and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. and the first-ever es hybrid. chase scene netflix coming soon extra butter tickets swoon penguin journey junior mints movie phone evil prince bollywood 3d shark attack ned the head 5% cashback signup for 5% cashback o
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
to the big stadium and watching the president of the united states make history. what do you say about 50,000. >> steve: if they had that many people. what if they said they had divide 0-- 70,000 and look at the weather, it may not rain during the big show. did bill upon clinton make his case. almost 50 minutes and went half an hour over his allotted time. he was long and vague at time and made the case that barak obama should get more time to finish the job. >> gretchen: did anybody think that bill clinton would not go over time. overlong and folksy and what he was like when he was president. he walked out to his campaign song don't stop thinking about tomorrow. the question is will it resonate for the people. people felt nostalgic and reminiscent when clinton was president. hoe has the highest approval rating of 65 percent if that makes people feel warm and fuzzy, it was a great night for the democrats. >> brian: to sum up the entire year. think about the topics. he covered about how the president of the united states took the opponents. and how great obama care is for the second daytha
lady of the united states. she's here at the time warner cable arena. she's now at the podium the right there. you can see she's getting instructions, trying to begin to get a little feel for that stage up there. the teleprompter that will eventually be there. she's going to deliver a major address here, obviously, in charlotte at the democratic national convention tomorrow night. that's what the first lady will be doing. she's been here now, i'm guessing for at least 45 minutes to an hour. she was up in the sky boxes walking around, doing some television interviews, and just beginning to get a flavor for what's going on. this will be a very important address. she's very popular out there. has high, high approval and favorability numbers. there's no doubt about that. and she's going to be under enormous pressure to deliver that big speech tomorrow night. we're here in "the situation room" watching everything that's going on. gloria borger is here. brianna keilar is here. as we see the first lady, this is normal. everybody does this. all the big speakers, at some point, they come in here
for the united states and the things that he's done for humanity, what a credible voice tonight. what a credible voice. as much as he has been through, as much as he was targeted, he can speak from experience and say i never hated those guys. i wanted to get something done, and he did. i thought he spoke very well to the economy tonight too. he made the case about the philosophy of success, about, you know, wealthy people doing a little bit more because they can. i mean, i thought he had a great -- >> i think before you lead the hate part, because he talked about people proud of being -- their kids being born in america, which referred to this is a deeper and different kind of hate. they hated hillary clinton for what she wanted to do. they hated him for what they wanted to do. they hate president obama because of what he wants to do and because of what he is. that's what he was eluding to. which was a different hate than bill clinton. they never asked bill clinton for his birth certificate. so he understands the levels of hate here. as much as they fought hillary and him, they never asked him f
opposition. overseas president obama restored the reputation of the united states within the community. dialling a and collaboration are once again possible with the return of spirit and trust and good will to our foreign policy. of course, there remains much to do. communities across america and countries around the world, life is too hard for too many people. we see their struggle and also our hearts go out to them. in the coming years our hands must continue to reach out to them. after all that remains to be done and at home and abroad, the evidence is overwhelming. president obama is a leader for america and we faison slaught of some of the most complicated and international challenges to confront any u.s. president in modern times. it is up to all of us to make sure that the american people understand exactly what is at stake. and at risk in this election. with president obama in oval office we can make good progress towards becoming a fairer, stronger, more prosperous america. and a nation adjusted to changing and challenging times, hold it true to unchanging principles. a leader
last week made no mention of military service members or the war the united states is still fighting in afghanistan. it's a point that tammy duckworth, a war-wounded veteran and illinois candidate for the house of representatives did not miss. >> when it comes to our men and women in harm's way, we have a clear choice on november 6th. last week mitt romney had a chance to show his support for the brave men and women he is seeking to command, but he chose to criticize president obama instead of even uttering the word afghanistan. >> and then there was one card the republicans kept so close to the vest that we never saw or heard any mention of it. it was as if their last two-term president never existed. maybe george w. bush was the invisible guy in the chair, but there was no missing the democrats last two-term president on wednesday night. if there was any card bill clinton was holding, it had to be a spade because he dug right into the accomplishments of the obama administration with a 49-minute workhorse, or donkey, of a speech. in fact, the new york giants could have taken some no
forces by the date certain that the united states is going to depart. if you stop the recruitment and revet all of the troops you would extend the amount of time before the united states reaches the level where it should say to the military that it's time for us to depart. but the united states says we're going to leave at this date. so the concern would be are you now going to try to accelerate the recruitment and training. the vetting process itself works well it just hasn't been enforce ed. >> do you think that perhaps there is a possibility that the u.s. will pull out earlier? >> no, i don't think so. not at all. i think what's important is the united states and nato have demonstrated a partnership with the afghans that is really unprecedented and unmatched. the united states is going to lean into the wind. they're not going to back off because we have got this trouble spot. they are instituting the rules and regulations they have in place. they are being more aggressive about those and they are also instituting a couple of extra steps in that there might be what is known as t
. there is the united states of america. there is not a black america and a white america and latino america and an asian america, but there is the united states of america. >> from the first time he took to the kconvention speech as th keynoter in 2004, there has been no doubt that barack obama can step into the spotlight and dazzle. four years later in denver, the optics match the excitement for the presidential campaign with greek columns surrounding him in front of a crowd of more than 75,000, and the democratic nominee delivered an electric speech. >> out of work, tough luck, you are on your own. no health care? the market will fix it. you're on your own. born into poverty? pull yourself up by your own boot straps, because even if you don't have boot, you are on your own. well, it is time for them to own their failure. it is time for us to change america, and that's why i'm running for president of the united states. >> this week in tampa, the republicans argue that barack obama is a great talker who doesn't deliver. it frames a dilemma for the third speech at a democratic national conv
jobs, i'm creating jobs. i'm fighting to improve schools in the united states of america. i'm not fighting on behalf of rich values or poor values or 53% value. i'm fighting for american values. he's fighting for american values. but the other candidate, the man behind the mask, he's offering us a budget that takes care of the rich but leaves everyone else in the dust. >> show me your budget. i'll tell you what you've got. let's take a look at their budget. why are they doing it? well, they are doing it because they have to. and here's the reason they have to. they cannot possibly, possibly continue to add to the tax cuts of the super wealthy. >> that's what is behind the romney mask. that's what the next 39 days to the election are all about. and a special thank you to our fake president and mitt romney for helping us to predict this election. joining me now unmasked is krystal ball, co-host of "the nik kell" on msnbc and dana milbank. thank you both for being here this evening. >> thank, reverend. >> krystal, let me start with you. romney is falling behind not because he's
of the united states. so that if they don't do so well, the expectations game is a little lower. reminds me when al gore was debating george w. bush in 2000, al gore, the vice president of the united states, was seen as a great debate, george w. bush not so much. but then al gore, you know, had some fumbles and in terms of the sighing he did and a lot of people were paying attention to that. and bush all of a sudden looked a whole lot better. these debates can be significant for relatively trivial things like that, if, for example, and you remember when the first president bush, george h.w. bush, you know, at one of the presidential debates started looking at his watch and it looked like he was ready to move on. let's get out of here, already. that hurt him, i think, in his re-election bid against bill clinton back in 1992. it is part of the game. it is what goes on. but i think these debates are going to be really, really important for that, 6%, 7%, 8% who are legitimately undecided or switchable, haven't completely made up their minds. they're going to be watching the three presidential debate
public investments. our good schools, our universities. medicare, security. and that in the united states when those two have met, when individual initiative has met with a common sacrifice and investment by the nation, that's what's created upward mobility. and the ability to reach the american dream in our society that makes america unique. and i put before the nation the clear choice that we have in this election between a leader in barack obama who will -- who has been doing that, making those investments and will in the future and another leader who would scale back from those investments and therefore i think hinder america's ability to be the land of opportunity going forward for everyone. >> where did you come up with that line of the night? i think it was the best line so far in this convention where you said mitt romney said just ask your old man for money when you want to start a business. you said why didn't i think of that? where did you come up with that great sarcasm? >> what i wanted to do was be optimistic but point out the differences. as the first lady pointed out very
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the west. but khrushchev actually realized th
clock on the convention floor. this is why. the united states pushing that 16 trillion mark yesterday. what does that mean for a president who wants a second term. we'll discuss and dismiss the debt like they do. chris christy said what is wrong with washington? well nancy pelosi. >> she is part of the problem. it is true. listen, any of the leaders are up there if they are not trying to make a difference. >> brian: chris christy sounded off and sang a bit with jimmie fallon. we'll bring it out because you were probably nodding off when he was talking to chris christie. all next for the 2012 election . ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> >> gretchen: good morning. i needed that election surge to get me through hump day. i needed that election. thank you for making my day. >> brian: we are wednesday and two more days left of the convention and we'll know here until friday morning. yesterday it was clear, we need more time and we are off to a great start and need more time. >> steve: plus we might need more umbrellas. supper time, it was coming down. >> brian: i didn't notice that. >> gretche
's effort. jon: what do they get out of it? is it iranian oil, is it tweaking the united states? >> reporter: it's both of those but they are acting in their own interest. as every nation should. we sometimes apologize for acting in our best interests. but russia and china view it as important to their agenda to block the sanctions in a meaningful way. jon: president obama said he would do whatever it takes to keep iran from gaining a nuclear weapon. will we? >> not under his administration, that is for sure. he's been saying this all openings are on the table for three and a half years and it just has no credibility at this point. the israelis don't believe him, the iranians don't believe him, the russians and the chinese don't believe him. that's why i believe ahmadinejad comes from a place of confidence because his overall stra teak eupblstrategic objectives can be well undertaken. the u.s. issued a statement this morning they weren't attending because it's yom kippur a hole who hwho he lee faith for the jewish faith. i think the u.s. delegation should have walked out on monday when mahm
illegal even here in the united states. in other words, the president of pakistan, one of our supposed allies, is calling for the united nations to enact international law that would trump the u.s. constitution. jon? jon: what a world. jonathan hunt, thanks. arthel: the road to victory in 2012 winding through ohio and the push for votes in this key swing state is kicking into high gear. president obama campaigning in ohio today less than a week before early voting gets underway. he'll be holding campus rallies at bowling green state university and kent state this afternoon hoping to drum up support among young voters. the republican campaign is crisscrossing the state on a three-day bus tour. governor romney today blasting the president's foreign policy and his handling of the economy. >> with incomes going down, every year going down, down, down, and prices of electricity up and health insurance up and the cost of gasoline having doubled, these are tough times even for families with jobs. i know what it takes to get this economy going again. i care about the people of america, and the
of the united states of america, and to the republic, for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. [ applause ] >> boy, she just looked great, didn't she? >> she did. you can imagine, the amount of therapy and hard work. >> oh. >> that she's had to endure to climb back from being -- she was literally shot in the head. >> in the head at close range. >> close blank range. that was a pretty pivotal time in the nation's conversation about where we stand and the tone of things. >> it was. >> what a symbol of hope she is. that was incredible. >> it was a very moving moment. >>> all right. coming up he nominated his dad, last night for another term as vice president, bo biden, the attorney general of delaware, joins us ahead here on "morning joe." former pennsylvania governor ed rendell, nbc news political director chuck todd and later maryland governor martin o'malley. up next mike allen is here with the politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the weekend forecast. >> good morning to you, mika. let me help get everyone out the door thi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 115 (some duplicates have been removed)

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